Clinical Basics

What is Immunoglobulin?

Immune globulin (Ig) is the general term used for replacement therapy. It can be administered intravenously (IV) or subcutaneously (SQ). Immune globulin is derived from pooled plasma from carefully screened human donors and processed using rigorous purification steps. It is used to treat a variety of ailments both on and off-label.

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Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP)

ITP is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks and destroys its own platelets. Sometimes this autoimmune response causes damage to megakaryoctyes as well, preventing the production of platelets in the bone marrow. Platelets are responsible for the normal clotting processes of blood. This platelet destruction leads to the inability of blood to clot normally.

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Bleeding Disorders

When the body responds normally to a tear in a blood vessel, a chain reaction of proteins, called clotting factors, act together in a specific order to form a blood clot. There are at least eleven clotting factors in the body. The deficiency of any one of these factors results in a bleeding disorder.

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Rh Sensitization and Pregnancy

Red blood cells (RBCs) are especially important to the body because they carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body, and remove carbon dioxide waste. On the surface of each RBC is a set of proteins. Which proteins you have is determined genetically.

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